— blending the mix

It’s time to rethink blog comments

  • Blog comments are dying
  • Tweets and Twitter accounts are more frequently cited in blogs posts now
  • Yet no notifications are provided to the person or tweet being cited (when not on Twitter)
  • Why can’t tweets cited off Twitter act like pingbacks do for links and blogs?

The what:

  • Scanned-through 182 blog posts last night
  • Usual ‘X got funding $Y’ and ‘A launched B’ stuff
  • One post stood out as significant:
    • Re/code is now stopping comments on its site
    • Re/code is a major publisher of digital news, founded only this year by the legendary Kara Swisher:
    • They have re-launched their site and are now removing the ability to leave comments
    • Repeat: one of the most respected digital (and social) news sites is removing the ability to perform an inherently social act

Why?

  • People are leaving fewer and fewer comments on blogs
  • General engagement around the news is happening on Twitter
  • The journalists themselves are interacting with readers on Twitter about their article
  • Ask yourself, when was the last time YOU left a comment on a blog – exactly!

Blogging is valuable though:

  • It powers the real-time conversation on Twitter
  • Habitually, bloggers now link to the Tweets or Twitter accounts of references
  • But the connections die because there’s no notifications
  • Yet engagement happens outside of the blog

 

  • So if blogs feed tweets
  • And tweets feed conversation
  • Why can’t tweets act like pingbacks in links? 
  • So both the bloggers and the people who inspire/perpetuate the valuable discussion be ‘rewarded’?

 

UPDATE:

  • Doesn’t solve the whole problem (i.e. the one about attributuion or notification of citation on Twitter(
  • Twitter Mentions as Comments‘ plugin does what it says on the tin
  • See the organised thread of comments below

 

10 comments
  1. @paulfabretti says: November 21, 20141:06 pm

    It’s time to rethink blog comments: Blog comments are dying
    Tweets and Twitter accounts are more frequently ci… http://t.co/ZwOIHh1g0L

  2. @AllthingsIC says: November 21, 20141:14 pm

    RT @paulfabretti: It’s time to rethink blog comments: Blog comments are dying
    Tweets and Twitter accounts are more frequently ci… http://…

  3. @ThePaulSutton says: November 21, 20141:19 pm

    This >> RT @paulfabretti: It’s time to rethink blog comments: Blog comments are dying http://t.co/bJsJwDknpl via @allthingsic

  4. @willchurchill says: November 21, 20141:51 pm

    Interesting thoughts on the relationship between blogs and twitter (via @paulfabretti): http://t.co/VUCHhmg7ad

  5. @vikkichowney says: November 21, 20142:36 pm

    MT @paulfabretti: Time to rethink blog comments: Tweets are more frequently fuelling conversation http://t.co/3GzZeP6P4F <- totally agree

  6. @BrendanCooper says: November 21, 20143:00 pm

    RT @paulfabretti: It’s time to rethink blog comments: Blog comments are dying
    Tweets and Twitter accounts are more frequently ci… http://…

  7. Stuart Bruce says: November 21, 20143:47 pm

    Indeed, the death of comments is making blogging far less useful. People can’t really have a sensible conversation about it as although you get lots of reaction it’s spread over Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn. What I have found interesting is when I cross post my blog content and publish it on LinkedIn it gets a lot more comments, just like the old days of blogs.

    The Twitter plug-in doesn’t entirely solve the problem as you need something that aggregates the response across every platform.

  8. paul.fabretti says: November 21, 20143:49 pm

    Indeed Stuart, and Robert Scoble has made some interesting observations about how interactions on his Facebook profile are much higher than they ever were on his other channels.

  9. @James_Mayes says: November 21, 20149:58 pm

    Rethinking blog comments http://t.co/SrwYNn7wcu < If you’re a regular blog reader or writer, this suggests a major shift is now happening

  10. @digitalmaverick says: November 21, 201410:21 pm

    RT @vikkichowney: MT @paulfabretti: Time to rethink blog comments: Tweets are more frequently fuelling conversation http://t.co/3GzZeP6P4F

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