— blending the mix

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February, 2012 Monthly archive
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Pinterest: 11,000,000 registered users with 32,400,000 pins.
The Fancy: 250,000 registered users with 16,700,000 fancies.

If you’re a trendsetter, you’re on The Fancy…

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Really valid points by Brian here about f-commerce. As the sage amongst the masses have known for a long time, just because you *can* put a shop in Facebook does not mean you *should*.

The key point Brian makes is one around frictionless (or seamless) sharing – where experience with brands and friends are shared automatically.

F-commerce is about serendipitous awareness and recommendations and not simply transacting through a box in a social network.

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Shocking how, for all the noise we make about Apple and Android, just how big the non-smartphone market REALLY is.

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Whilst it’s easy to bash what the likes of Klout and Kred are doing (generally, those who complain the most are the ones to whom these scores matter), they are actually beginning to solve, or provide a good direction to a major problem anyone working in social media has had for some time – identifying not only people who can change or influence others’ opinions, but also the kinds of content that these people are more widely associated with.

I also really love the way they are approaching their business model – they totally understand their market and what it wants. As such, whilst you may easily be able to find an influencer, you won’t (unless you go through them) know what topics they are influential for when considering a Perk programme.

I really hope that this works out well for Klout.

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Interesting question here – why are we so concerned about Pinterest making money off our interactions when Facebook has been doing it for years – but with our much more personal information?

Is it because more people understand affiliate marketing – and have experienced the spammy nature of its content? Or is it that most people just don’t understand how Facebook makes money from them?

The interesting, or perhaps biggest risk I see Pinterest facing is in the relationships it will now have (or perhaps, NOT have) with brands.

The launch of Google + brand Pages saw its biggest growth spurt in users since it launched – as brands scrambled to create their own space – but what will brands now think about the affiliate relationship with Pinterest content?

Whether brands are using Pinterest in any kind of “subversive” manner (i.e. creating profiles called their company name for example and collating customer/product-related pins), even now they must be thinking twice that potentially, content they are creating for their own customers is funding another business, or worse still, is actually COSTING them money through the affiliate links Pinterest is adding.

Tough times ahead which, on the face of it but which could have a simple solution – search-indexed premium brand pages with customisation capabilities would more than offset the sparce revenues that affiliate marketing would generate.

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Pinterest may be facing user backlash in the wake of the news that the company has been quietly making money off of its customer base.  Josh Davis at LLSocial.com uncovered the when a pin is posted to the site and it links to an ecommerce site with an affiliate program, Pinterest modifies the link to add their own affiliate tracking code.

Interesting question here – why are we so concerned about Pinterest making money off our interactions when Facebook has been doing it for years – but with our much more personal information?

Is it because more people understand affiliate marketing – and have experienced the spammy nature of its content? Or is it that most people just don’t understand how Facebook makes money from them?

The interesting, or perhaps biggest risk I see Pinterest facing is in the relationships it will now have (or perhaps, NOT have) with brands.

The launch of Google + brand Pages saw its biggest growth spurt in users since it launched – as brands scrambled to create their own space – but what will brands now think about the affiliate relationship with Pinterest content?

Whether brands are using Pinterest in any kind of “subversive” manner (i.e. creating profiles called their company name for example and collating customer/product-related pins), even now they must be thinking twice that potentially, content they are creating for their own customers is funding another business, or worse still, is actually COSTING them money through the affiliate links Pinterest is adding.

Tough times ahead which, on the face of it but which could have a simple solution – search-indexed premium brand pages with customisation capabilities would more than offset the sparce revenues that affiliate marketing would generate.

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Interesting point of view about data – surprised this time though that it is Path in the firing line rather than Facebook.

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When you think of the impact that Pinterest is having on e-commerce and the evidence suggesting that Facebook fans equate to an additional 20 site visits per month, you can see how close we are to attributing genuine commercial benefit to social media matters.

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Fantastic news for Pinterest. It presents a really interesting challenge for both delicious AND google. Pinterest brings together the benefit of social bookmarking for images – so does google integrate the images into its search results or simply the links?

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