— blending the mix

Archive
July, 2009 Monthly archive

So I spoke at the Figaro Digital “Social Media” event on Tuesday. I really struggled to think of anything useful to talk about (some might say I didn’t even achieve that!), after all, how many times will people regurgitate the same old case studies and say the same old things “the customer is in control” blah, blah, blah…

Instead, I left the insightful stuff to my new buddy, all-round good guy and smart-cookie Freddie (and just had to agree with everything he said!) and thought I’d do something practical, that didn’t preach and simply highlighted some just some really useful really.

As it turned out, 90% of the audience was already using Twitter in a personal capacity and almost 50% in a professional one – who needed me to tell them how or why to Tweet?!

So, the presentation is below for you all to see. As always, i’d love to hear your thoughts and ideas, recommendations, criticisms (be fair though!!)

Technorati Tags: ,,,


Read More

Marta follows up her amazing potty-mouthed social media presentation with an update. I don’t honestly think a lot has changed in terms of what tools we are using, but there is a definite mood of – it’s here, just f*cking do it now, you have no excuses (in Marta’s words anyway!)

And if you missed the first one…

And in case you had ANY doubt as to whether Marta is the real deal, the above presentation has been seen a total of over 131,000 times and embedded over a 1000 times. The kinds of figures any one producing a video would be proud of – and this is a presentation on social media for f*cks sake!


Read More

I seem to be a on a roll with the Facebook stuff at the moment, but this little gem from Nexus would get even Rodney and Nick excited (if they aren’t already!)

The Social Graph – a quick refresher

We have talked for some time about the “social graph” – this sometimes mythical explanation of an individual’s profile in a social network. The cynics amongst you may consider it Social CRM – and if we weren’t now approaching customers as people rather than numbers (as we used to!), you’d probably not be far wrong.

Facebook has always been an exciting tool to help us understand this social graph (you might argue that the structure of Facebook means that the phrase derived from Facebook). Applications are/were one of the best ways to understand the complexity, strength, depth and reach of an individual’s presence in Facebook.

When someone adds an application in Facebook, we are privy to a whole host of information about that person and their network that is in the words of the olden-days “gold dust”.

What this access does is helps us understand the person behind the profile. As the video below shows (the bomb gets dropped at 1m 35s to be precise!), customers are no longer a set of general demographics.

 

But if the social graph helps us understand WHO the customer is rather than WHAT they are – and approach them appropriately – one thing we are still struggling with (and pals Tim and Matt are making a good stab at doing), is understanding within these social graphs, just WHO are the influencers. Who SHOULD we be talking to?

Network Influence

I’ve been working with Influencer Mapping for over 3 years, and whilst I will be the first to admit I don’t really understand how it works, I know what to do with the information when I get it. Sometimes though, this can be timely and expensive and even unreliable. I think Tim and Matt would be the first to admit that DIY influencer mapping is tricky at best.

Tying all this up with Facebook though is a bit trickier. As a closed network, we have never really been able to understand who the most influential people (not the most popular) are in any given network – until Nexus launched the tool which created the map below:

friend map

So, it’s a “standard” network distribution map, but this has come from Facebook – one of the first to be exportable. You have to add the application (as you did with Touchgraph some time ago!) but you can then play with the results to your heart’s content here – outside of Facebook.

Nice, but not really THAT clever Paul…

And in a way, you are right – what good is this to anyone?

What if you had a Facebook Page for your brand or client though…what if you could add the Nexus graphing application to your Page…what if you could then map out and cluster the people who were fans of your Page…and you could also identify the people with the most common connections…or those who had the most in common…suddenly you are able to look at your audience in an entirely different way…and put more of your focus on developing relationships with the people who have the potential to be big advocates…rather than those who may simply be in it for the freebie you were giving away…

Assuming that the graphing tool can be ported over to Facebook Pages, we could have ourselves a very useful new planning tool.


Read More

Even since sharing badges (see the image below) made their way into web pages 18 months or so ago, nobody really has any idea of what bookmarking services they should add to their content to give their content the greatest reach.

We all talk about syndication and dissemination of content but without really knowing where the best places are for our content to go – or, more importantly, the tools that most people use to circulate out content. No more.

Add to any, the people behind one of the most successful (and easy to implement) bookmarking buttons have released the chart below, detailing just what services most people post to.

I think there is a pinch of salt required with this because I suspect the data is Addtoany’s alone, but it makes for interesting reading. If, despite my post yesterday about Facebook’s audience numbers, you thought Facebook was a pointless place to target any marketing activity, perhaps this chart will make you think again – and do so in a way which means any message you do put out are relevant, timely and appropriate.

There’s a simpler version of the same graph here (with a lot of the lesser-known sites./sources taken out)

 

 


Read More

Robin’s chart below had some interesting stats about a huge surge in Facebook traffic last month when Facebook launched the vanity URL’s. Traffic to the site was up 9.5% on the previous Sunday.

So, in an attempt to place a line in the sand for many of you out there (clients and friends) who ask me how many people make up this huge social network, I spent a bit of time in the facebook ad centre splitting the UK Facebook population by gender and age – so haters, blame the peculiarities of people not putting gender or their ages correctly if some of the numbers don’t stack up!

Hope you find it interesting:

Total UK Facebook Audience:

Total UK numbers on Facebook (13+): 18,893,560

Total UK numbers on Facebook (18+): 16,422,540

Gender

Of the “more widely marketable” 18+ audience

Male: 8,471,880

Female: 9,734,640

Relationship Status

Single: 4,193,620

In a relationship: 3,818,520

Married: 3,345,920

Engaged: 873,080

City networks

Of the main UK cities, which has the largest network and what is their gender split?

London: 4,162,800

  • Male: 1,958,660
  • Female: 2,082,620

Manchester: 3,602,380

    • M: 1,618,260
    • F: 1,906,540

Leeds: 3,289,940

  • M: 1,490,960
  • F: 1,715,320

Birmingham: 1,706,180

  • M: 767,140
  • F: 869,060

Newcastle: 339,040

  • M: 156,500
  • F: 167,360

Note that this won’t represent the overall numbers of people from these cities, merely those who have assigned themselves to a network and who live within Facebook’s default 50mile city radius setting.

Total UK audience by age and gender

Age 18-24: 5,287,780

  • Male: 2,426,840
  • Female: 2,670,340

Age 25-30: 3,622,960

  • Male:1,744,480
  • Female: 1,862,540

Age 31-35: 2,153,020

  • Male: 978,240
  • Female: 1,058,520

Age 36-40: 1,835,400

  • Male: 820,160
  • Female: 907,480

Age 41-45: 1,306,700

  • Male: 560,720
  • Female: 666,420

Age 46-50: 886,240

  • Male: 371,900
  • Female: 449,680

Age 51-55: 566,000

  • Male: 231,560
  • Female: 302,240

Age 56-60: 381,580

  • Male: 157,780
  • Female: 200,540

Age 61-64: 210,120

  • Male: 85,960
  • Female:  105,120

So, there you have it – hope it helps you to make some useful decisions!


Read More

Charlene Li comes up trumps again with this fascinating rating of the Top 100 brand using social media.

 


Read More

Really good piece calling for an improved level of honesty when it comes to leaving comments on blogs.
Blog posts have always been susceptible to negative comments - a  company with a blog should welcome and embrace them really but this article drives to the core of what is fundamentally wrong with many client’s understanding of social media.
The social media specialist is often mocked for claiming to have insight into social media tools and communities that rely on nothing more than common sense - and to some extent, this is true but as George points out, clients who decide, without counsel, to leave anonymous comments on blogs when criticised are only likely to open themselves up for further criticism.
Whether a client has a blog or not, whether they twitter or not is largely irrelevant. If you or your client are going to get involved by doing something as simple as leaving a comment on a blog,  be honest, say who you are and what your point of view is.
As I often say, you will often be credited with at least being there and listening.
Climate denial ‘astroturfers’ should stop hiding behind pseudonyms | Environment | guardian.co.uk

Really good piece calling for an improved level of honesty when it comes to leaving comments on blogs.

Blog posts have always been susceptible to negative comments – a company with a blog should welcome and embrace them really but this article drives to the core of what is fundamentally wrong with many client’s understanding of social media.

The social media specialist is often mocked for claiming to have insight into social media tools and communities that rely on nothing more than common sense – and to some extent, this is true but as George points out, clients who decide, without counsel, to leave anonymous comments on blogs when criticised are only likely to open themselves up for further criticism.

Whether a client has a blog or not, whether they twitter or not is largely irrelevant. If you or your client are going to get involved by doing something as simple as leaving a comment on a blog,  be honest, say who you are and what your point of view is.

As I often say, you will often be credited with at least being there and listening.

Climate denial ‘astroturfers’ should stop hiding behind pseudonyms | Environment | guardian.co.uk


Read More

This is one of the most exciting events I have seen. I received this invitation to attend the Pepsi Brandhack. Main problem is I’m in the UK, the brandhack is in the US…shame.

The UK would benefit from something like this – and I don’t just mean because it will give a voice to some of the smaller agencies over here (who are bloody good at what the do but who perhaps don’t get considered alongside the big-boys), but because I think we have some of the most switched-on, creative people in the world here – and it would be a great opportunity to give these places a voice.

Something similar exists in Headbox a community where brands can solicit feedback (and ideas) from a variety fo members who meet that brand’s audience demographic (the 440ml can of Tango for example).

Made by Many, a fab digital/social media consultancy carried out a similar exercise for Amnesty International, getting the help of social media fan boys and girls to help shape their ideas.

As social technologies mature, we are clearly moving to a more collaborative way of working with customers.

Far removed from internal design and build, brands are clearly now looking to not only engage with their audiences but include them as part of the design process – thereby ensuring that what they deliver (and therefore the brand experience) remains consistent with the brand message and experience but also totally in line with what the customer expects of them.

Dell Ideastorm and My Starbucks Ideas are early-stage customer collaboration tools that still require the brand to deliver something at the end but this form of collaboration is still one way, not entirely two-way innovation – you send us an idea, we will do it.

The opportunities to embrace an entirely collaborative consumer experience are utterly immense. The potential for loyalty where the brand entwines itself with its customers for product development, marketing (should it ever be called that in this next phase!) and even HR (as BestBuy recently did last week!) put the customer truly at the heart of the business.

More to come on this one I think…

brandhack, the next web, social media, pepsi


Read More

please ignore (i know it won’t be difficult!)


Read More

So, a LITTLE later than expected (apologies to all involved!), I am please to announce that the winner of the ticket is Kate Matlock.

All entries were allocated a number (both on twitter and comments left here and a number was drawn at random – and Kate’s came out.

Kate, I’ll let the guys know to expect you and look forward to seeing you there. Kate, i’ll also drop you an email in a second too!

Technorati Tags:
Read More